Maize was prominent in the religious pantheon and in worship among the main precolumbine cultures.

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Among the Mayas, their existed a god of maize, the third most frequently mentioned in the codices, who is always represented as a young man, and sometimes with a cob of corn as an ornament on his head. At other times the cob surges from the hieroglyph of the day of Kan, which is the symbol of corn in the codices. Kan was also the day of which this god was a patron. Of all the gods represented in the codices, this deity is the one that appears with a greater deformation of the skull than the others. The god of maize was the patron of farming and he appears directly or sometimes personified as a priest in Maya sculptures, watering the grains of corn on the head of Mother Earth. The Aztecs had Cintéotl or Centéotl as the god of maize. He was the son of Tlazoltéotl and Xochiquetzal, the godess of flowers. Additionally, there were several godesses of maize that were young and beautiful: Chicomecóatl (seven serpents or seven corncobs) was the most important of them all, and she was in charge of caring for the harvest and subsistence. Xilonen was the “mother of tender corn”. The Incas had no god devoted to maiz, since their religion had few gods and was centered on the cult of the Sun, called Inti, who protected the State, but the plant appeared in all-important ceremonies, even before other traditional crops of the Andean region, like the potato. Maize was considered a valuable element that could be sacrificed to the gods, specially the Sun, and mainly in the form of chicha (maize liqueur).

Maize was prominent in the religious pantheon and in worship among the main precolumbine cultures.